Lawyer Threatens Yelp Reviewer With Lawsuit, Is Wrong

Kyle Barella is an immigration lawyer with his own firm. Last week he gave an "exclusive" interview to Breitbart News Network on his views about birthright citizenship and the whole "anchor baby" controversy. That was, of course, his right. He said he thinks that birthright citizenship is being abused and that we should end it. He said so rather mildly, particularly given where he was being quoted.

This is modern America, so naturally someone was upset about his viewpoint and left his law firm a one-star review on Yelp complaining that his ideas are "borderline racist." It's his only review right now. The reviewer — "Amir K." — thinks that Kyle Barella shouldn't be an immigration lawyer because of his views on birthright citizenship:

[Read more…]

Dr. Mario J.A. Saad Tries, And Fails, To Censor American Diabetes Association

Dr. Saad is mad.

Dr. Saad is mad because of something bad — specifically, the American Diabetes Association, through its journal Diabetes, is publishing expressions of concern about some of his scholarly articles, and may formally withdraw them.

Expressions of concern — like formal withdrawal of past articles — are part of the peer review process. It's how scientific journals police themselves and call attention to questions raised about research they've published. Naturally they are a source of annoyance to the authors questioned, as I've written about in the cases of several legal threats against the blog Retraction Watch.

So when the ADA began questioning Dr. Saad's work, he and his lawyers at Deutsch Williams did not rely on the peer review process, or on advocacy or persuasion. Don't be ridiculous! This is America. So they sued.

Dr. Saad sued the ADA for defamation, claiming that they were harming his reputation by printing digital expressions of concern about his work, preparing a print run, and declining to publish him further until their concerns were assuaged. That much — the attempt to vindicate scientific propositions through litigation, rather than through . . . you know . . . science — is banal at this point. What makes Dr. Saad and his lawyers notable is the remedy they demand.

Dr. Saad demanded in his complaint, and sought through a motion, an injunction forcing the ADA to remove its expressions of concern, and prohibiting it from publishing them or withdrawing Dr. Saad's articles. This is aggressive, in the sense of patently ridiculous. Dr. Saad is demanding prior restraint of speech, something that is prohibited (at least as pre-trial relief) in almost all circumstances.

When you are asking a federal judge to do something patently unconstitutional, and you're not a federal prosecutor, you face a conundrum. Do you attempt to distinguish the decades of Supreme Court cases saying that the judge can't do what you want, explaining in creative fashion why they don't apply? Or do you just ignore the issue and hope it doesn't come up? Dr. Saad's lawyers went with the later strategy, which might be called Underpants Gnome lawyering. Their brief studiously ignores the First Amendment, the wall of prior restraint authority, and the equitable doctrine that defamation can't be enjoined.1 The ADA's brief in opposition is more or less "what the fuck, man?" with bluebooking and footnotes.

Lawyers employ Underpants Gnome lawyering because sometimes it works. It didn't this time. United States District Judge Timothy Hillman denied Dr. Saad's request for an injunction politely but firmly:

Whatever interest Dr. Saad has in preserving his professional reputation, it is not enough to overcome the heavy presumption against the proposed order’s validity. This is precisely the type of circumstance in which the law forbids courts from halting speech before it occurs. See Near v. Minnesota, 283 U.S. 697, 716, 51 S.Ct. 625 (1931) (declaring unconstitutional a court order preventing The Saturday Press from publishing a defamatory newspaper); Krebiozen, 334 Mass. 86 (affirming denial of injunction that would have prevented the publication of statements harmful to medical researchers’ professional reputations). The appropriate remedy in cases where a “publisher is to print a libelous, defamatory, or injurious story . . . lies not in an injunction against publication but in a damages or criminal action after publication.” In re Providence Journal Co., 820 F.2d 1342, 1345 (1st Cir. 1986).

This was not a close call.

Dr. Saad may still proceed seeking damages against the ADA, and might, hypothetically, get an injunction against specific statements found to be false after a full trial. But his effort to vindicate his scientific view through force of law has failed.

I offer no opinion on whether the ADA is right, or reasonable, in questioning Dr. Saad's research for scientific reasons. I got through my science/math/bio requirements in college through a Physics for Poets class in which I got a B+ by writing a speculative essay about antimatter derivative of 1950s Heinlein essays. But I do question the reliability of Dr. Saad's research on this basis: how can you trust the science of someone who tried to get a court order prohibiting public questioning of their conclusions? If a new therapy were based on a scientific theory that was defended not with peer review and the scientific method, but with litigation, would you trust it to be used on a loved one? I wouldn't. Dr. Saad may find that his litigiousness has harmed his credibility more than anything the ADA has ever said or done.

Hat tip to the folks at Retraction Watch.

"Digital Homicide Studio" Abuses DMCA To Lash Out At Reviewer Jim Sterling, Gets Fair Use Wrong

Frivolous abuse of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act is nothing new. We've seen fake poets, manufacturers,purveyors of anatomically impossible boobs, sociopathic revenge-pornsters, and legbreakers for totalitarian governments make false claims of copyright violations in an effort to censor online criticism.

So why should we be surprised that a computer game designer would abuse a DMCA takedown request to silence a negative review?

[Read more…]

Popehat Signal: Help Fight the Censorious Villainy Of Roca Labs

New Popehat Signal courtesy of Nigel Lew.  Thanks, Nigel!

It's time to light the Popehat Signal to find pro bono assistance for citizens threatened with a bogus and censorious lawsuit.

The cartoonish villain of this story is Roca Labs, whose belligerent attempts to silence critics inspired my post last month. Roca Labs, you may recall, produces a pink slime that one is supposed to eat to suppress the appetite. Roca Labs is pathologically adverse to criticism, and therefore has hit upon an increasingly familiar tactic — they require at least some of their customers to sign contracts promising not to criticize them at all. Based on those contracts, they filed a lawsuit against Pissed, a gripe site that printed complaints by their customers. Their quasi-legal flailing became more desperate when First Amendment heavyweight Marc Randazza took up's defense.

Now Roca Labs has crossed the Rubicon from mildly entertaining legal buffoonery to outright despicable abuse of the system calculated to suppress not only the right to free speech but the right to petition the government. As TechDirt first reported, Roca Labs has now sued — in Florida — three of its customers from other states. What's notable about these three customers? One of them provided witness testimony in Roca Labs' lawsuit against Roca Labs has previously complained about many different customers exercising free speech, but now wantonly targets just these three consumers, one of whom just happened to be a witness against them.2 Roca Labs is demanding damages, attorney fees, and an injunction prohibiting these consumers from criticizing Roca Labs. As Techdirt points out, Roca Labs' attorneys rather comically assert that the defendants' criticisms are "defamation per se" because they agreed in advance contractually that they would be. That's not how it works, dipshits.

Roca Labs isn't a full Prenda yet, but by God, it's trying.

Those three defendants need help. Even when a suit is patently frivolous and vexatious, defending it — particularly in a distant state — is ruinously expensive. That's Roca Labs's purpose — not to win on the merits, but to silence critics through cynical abuse of the legal system. These three defendants can't afford to hire lawyers in Florida. If they don't get help, Roca Labs wins through manipulation of a broken system.

You can help. If you are a lawyer admitted in Florida, you can act, at least, as local counsel. If you are a lawyer in another state, you can help Florida counsel. If you're just someone with a voice on the internet, you can help get the word out about Roca Labs and its contemptible behavior, and help these people find pro bono legal assistance. (Some sort of fundraising campaign, at least for costs, is also a possibility, though the defendants should get independent legal advice about that.) You can also get the word out about the unethical and repulsive behavior of the attorneys who filed this suit, Nicole Freedlander and Paul Berger of the "Hurricane Law Group." Berger has also been involved in threatening bloggers and witnesses.

And finally, please help circulate and promote this question: why would any sensible person consume a weight-loss product from a company that sues customers who criticize its safety, value, or efficacy? Does that sound safe to you?

By the way, this is not the end of Roca Labs' bizarre behavior — stay tuned for more.

Fight evil.

Lena Dunham, Meet Barbara Streisand — Have You Met?

Lena Dunham, who apparently is famous for a HBO show I haven't watched, has a memoir out. I don't approve of 28-year-olds having memoirs unless and until they have been shot for advocating for the downtrodden or something, but Ms. Dunham is hardly the first to commit this minor sin.

This weekend Ms. Dunham became very upset because some people — mostly on conservative political websites — described her memoir as a confession to sexually abusing her little sister.

Here's how "Truth Revolt" characterized quotations from the memoir:

In the collection of nonfiction personal accounts, Dunham describes using her little sister at times essentially as a sexual outlet, bribing her to kiss her for prolonged periods and even masturbating while she is in the bed beside her. But perhaps the most disturbing is an account she proudly gives of an episode that occurred when she was seven and her sister was one.

You can read the subsequent quoted passage for yourself.

Now Ms. Dunham has, according to Truth Revolt, threatened them with a lawsuit and demanded that their post be taken down. Ben Shapiro, author of the pieces, has not yet responded to our request that he post the threat letter. So we only have his word that Ms. Dunham made this demand and threat. However, I submit that Mr. Shapiro has a certain amount of credibility on the subject of overheated reactions to things.

If Ms. Dunham is alleging that the original Truth Revolt article about her is defamatory, she is wrong — unless it has deliberately and extensively misquoted her book. Truth Revolt has admitted that the article originally and incorrectly said that she was 17, not 7, when one of the incidents described took place. But absent proof that Truth Revolt made that misstatement intentionally, that's incompetence, not the actual malice required to prove up defamation of a public figure like Ms. Dunham.

Truth Revolt's characterization of Ms. Dunham's memoir is not defamation. It's classic opinion based on specific disclosed facts. You might think that Truth Revolt's interpretation of Dunham's stories of her conduct with her sister is irrational, or unfair, or politically biased, or cruel. That doesn't make it defamatory. If I linked to one of Ben Shapiro's articles and said "this article proves that Ben Shapiro is a secret lizard person sent by Obama to discredit conservatives," that wouldn't be defamation either. It might be crazy, but it's my statement of opinion based on Shapiro's own words. If Truth Revolt had said "people have told me that Lena Dunham molested her sister" or "I have reviewed documents that suggest to me that Lena Dunham molested her sister," that would be different — that would be a statement of fact, or a statement of opinion based on undisclosed facts.

So: Ms. Dunham will fail, sooner or later, if she sues over this article. Her threat, and her reaction to the coverage, are likely to trigger the Streisand Effect, driving orders of magnitude more eyes to the characterizations of her memoir. She's media-savvy enough that I can't help but wonder whether that's her intention in the first place. It will sell books.

I haven't read the memoir and have no plans to do so. I find some of Dunham's descriptions of her conduct (as quoted) creepy and unsettling. But I also think that classifying a seven-year-old's behavior as sexual abuse is, at least, problematical. (Being disturbed by the tone Dunham uses to relate her seven-year-old behavior is a separate issue.) I seriously doubt that the discussion of abuse of or by children will be advanced by a dispute that is deliberately politically charged.

Did Sundance Vacations Forge A Court Order To Suppress Online Criticism?

Sundance Vacations would like to bill itself as a purveyor of wholesale and discount vacations. But on the internet, it is widely described as a sleazy hard-sell telemarketer selling sales presentations.

Companies are increasingly aggressive — perhaps belligerent is the better word — in defending their online reputation. There's evidence that Sundance Vacations has taken this trend to a new extreme through forging court documents in an effort to suppress criticism.

Matt Haughey has the story. When Sundance demanded that critical posts be taken down from Metafilter, and provided an apparent court order from Mississippi, Matt did something very rare and special — he exercised critical thinking. Matt noted discrepancies in the purported court order, crowdsourced a request to determine whether the case actually existed, and eventually did the legwork himself by calling the clerk's office. The result:

Today (Tuesday) I called a clerk in the Hinds County Chancery Court office. They asked me to fax them a copy of the court order so they could verify the document. I did as requested and a few hours later got a call back from the office saying it was not a real document from their court. The case numbers on the first page are from an unrelated case that took place last year. The clerk said they found a case from August 21, 2014 that used similar language but had different plaintiffs and defendants, but the same lawyers on page 3. In their opinion, it seemed someone grabbed a PDF from a different case and copy/pasted new details to it before sending it on to me.

Naughty, naughty, naughty. And so very reckless.

I've written to Sundance Vacations, a rep there who wrote to Matt before, the account that sent the court order this time, and Sundance's attorney of record on the order, asking them all for comment. I'm moving on to seek comment from the opposing lawyers in that apparently cut-and-pasted case. I'll report more if I learn it. Matt explains that the fake order came from a gmail account; Sundance may attempt to distance itself and deny responsibility for that account.

For now, Sundance Vacations is about to learn about the Streisand Effect. BoingBoing has picked up the story, and more will follow. And could there be consequences for using forged court documents in interstate commerce to suppress commercial criticism? Gosh, what an interesting question . . . .

Updated: On its Facebook page, Sundance Vacations confirms the prior email to Matt but denies it sent the recent one with the apparently forged documents, as predicted above.


Ares Rights, Bless Its Heart, Continues Bumbling Attempts At Censorship

Last summer I wrote about Ares Rights, a nominal "anti-piracy" firm that acts as a small-time legbreaker for various South American governments. When we encountered Ares they were trying to scrub discussions of Ecuador's spying practices through bogus DMCA notices. More recently Ares Rights abused the DMCA to suppress reporting on Ecuadoran corruption.

Now — because the internet is all about shoving everything up its own ass, as Jeff Winger would say — Ares Rights is sending out frivolous DMCA demands trying to silence discussion of its use of frivolous DMCA demands. Ares Rights responded to the Electronic Frontier Foundation's blog post about their abuse with, as Adam Steinbaugh reports, sending a DMCA notice demanding removal of the blog post. If that's not meta enough for you, now Ares Rights has issued a DMCA notice seeking to take down Adam Steinbaugh's blog post discussing their DMCA notice targeting the EFF's blog post discussing their prior DMCA notices.

It's not clear what Ares Rights hopes to accomplish. Their DMCAs will fail. This won't slow coverage. Trying to brush off the EFF or Steinbaugh with a DMCA notice is like trying to get a dog to stop humping your leg by petting it and feeding it bacon. Maybe they bill by the hour, even for patently ridiculous tasks? Maybe they are trying to convince their Ecuadorian masters that they are doing something, anything? Maybe they are just really very bad at their jobs? Stay tuned to find out.

Meanwhile, maybe you could go to their Facebook page and tell them what you think.

Edited to add: Ares Rights is deleting comments on their Facebook page, but they can't delete reviews here.

Adam Steinbaugh has responded to the DMCA notice.

"Atavistic Oncology" Doctor Develops New And Exciting Theories of Defamation Law

Dr. Frank Arguello is an advocate for an "atavistic" theory of cancer. What does that mean? Well:

Atavistic metamorphosis proposes that cancer cells are cells that have reverted, evolutionarily, to their ancestral, independent status as unicellular organisms. It is from there that cancer only occurs in plants and animals/humans (multicellular organisms). This also explains why cancer does not occur nor can be induced experimentally in unicellular organisms such as bacteria, fungi and protozoa.

[Read more…]

Randy Queen Offers Comical Response To Online Criticism of His Work "Darkchylde"

Randy Queen is a comic book artist and the creator of Darkchylde, an improbably-breasted teen who can transform into creatures from her nightmares. He also writes related poetry.


Rain, Rain, falling down
Grey sky shadows, and my sad heart

. . . and so on.

Now, I am not personally offended by improbably-breasted women in comics. I recognize them for what they are: a cultural signal, like golf pants or McDonalds' Golden Arches. Their presence on a book or comic cover signifies that you will encounter nothing unfamiliar or unsettling therein. Anatomically incorrect breasts are the dogs-playing-poker of fantasy art.

[Read more…]